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>>> this is "bbc world news america." taking to the fight to the heart of israel. set to receive britain's backing, syriana's new opposition leaders have talks in london. and the unmistakable sound of led zeppelin. we talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire have increased dramatically. one young couple went out to look at the rocket dam
, but particularly the president, the first lady, and their daughters. this is a time of great challenges for america, and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> and then it was the president's turn. he and his family walked out on stage early this morning to cries of four more years. >> tonight more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. tonight in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back, and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> and we're going to hear more from both men in just a few moments but, first, let's go over to nbc tracie pots who is live from obama headquarters in chicago. tracie, no doubt this was a hard fought battle for president obama. >> absolutely, lynn. now the cleanup here at victory headquarters. the end of a campaign but the beginning of a second term for president obama. a
>> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. and reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. as china a point new leaders, will pay heed a warning to crack down on corruption president assad vows to live and die in syria, striking a violent note as the violence continues. and born into indian royalty, she risk her life behind enemy lines during world war ii. today she is finally honored for sacrifice. >> welcome to our viewers on public television and also around the globe and. tonight, the princess is installing the menu are going to leave china -- the process to install the men who are going to lead and china is under way. the outgoing china -- the outgoing president told them the correction is so-called -- so bad in china it could threaten leadership of the state. >> two days after america elected its president, china has begun the process of anointing its next leader. but no election here, instead, 2000 communist party delegates, including many from the army gathered for their progress. .hina's 1.3 billion people the communist party has reform in china, but
of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker: without objection. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, last wednesday's newspaper, a retired foreign service officer wrote a letter with questions regarding the terrorist attack in benghazi, libya. retired foreign service officer, william boudreau, worked in the state department operations center, which serves as a direct line of communications to all american missions. based on his service, boudreau is confident that alerts from benghazi were delivered to the white house during the attack. boudreau believes the following questions must be explained -- why the delay in labeling the attack as terrorism, why did they allow ambassador stevens go to benghazi? why did they refuse
in our hearts for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> the voters speak. huge victory for president obama. >> winning pretty much all of the key battleground states, including ohio. >> we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >> the crowd here in chicago is going bananas. >> there is just this sense of deflation and defeat in this room. >> i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction, but the nation chose another leader. >> the president has been re-elected, but nobody's put the stamp of approval on his program. >> the republicans have maintained control of the house of representatives. the democrats will still be in charge of the senate. >> it's now whether president obama decides to come into office, use this victory as an opportunity to make compromises with the republicans. >> apparently, all he those do is show up in a nice suit, give them free health care, save the auto industry
for decades and that is what represented america pez influence as a prolonged role in the gulf. >>host: i always think of the british of involvement in the middle east. how did they step back? >>guest: with regard to the gulf of brits arrived in the 1800 representing their quest to provide order on the flanks to the imperial interest of india. the southern coast of the gulf was called the piru coast. constantly feuding tribes would feud with one another spilling out of the seaboard approach to in the and resulted in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the persian golf. the aftermath of rope or two with the independence of india that the british brigade at -- began their retrenchment with the independence of india, the british lost the rationale for their military presence and their lost the money to pay for their presence there. >>host: did the americ
and issues whether it is health care or pay. >> they are choosing america's holiday season to get their message across and get their employers on the spot. you think that turns the sentiment against the unions. nit is not the best pr strategy. if i put my historian hat on here a bit. work is more hexploited in tough times. it is it the rise of the unions and the port problem as it were. they were violating the california state laws. we are talking about the union and so far. is is it a problem. njohnathon wayne mentioned the port of oaklandnd six percent of all u.s. goods. that is the union's point to cause disruption and hurt the economy. and i tell you, they have every right to strike but the employers have the rht to kick the ass to the curve. a job is a mutually agreeable trade. employers offering a job and if they don't like hit the brickings. >> do you think it is bador the economy over all. we are in a fiscal cliff and rough waters here and now this to deal with? >> i think it could be bad for the econy. they have the merchandise and this is not going to affect thanksgiving
, the new kids on the block. 99% of new jobs in america come from companies that are less than five years old. u.k. research shows 6% of companies with the fastest growth rate generate over half of the new jobs. yet government policy here has often been stacked against these start-ups. when i became prime minister, these companies were not even allowed to bid on central government contracts. 70% of government i.t. spending just went to government multinationals. we are changing that, tearing up the rules, spending hundreds of millions of dollars to stimulate investment, getting behind technology wherever it starts to emerge. we're working with the london stock exchange to make it easier for companies across europe to float here in london, because that is a vital part of how we track the entrepreneurial businesses and investors to generate the jobs and growth we need. there are those who think that a modern industrial strategy is just about acquiring the regions. yes, our country has become far too centralized. but we are changing that. we need bold, national decisions as well. cross rail,
with chairman hall for nearly four years to ensure america obtained human space flight. the budget of 2010 threatened to stop that, he used all his tools of public service to help him win the battle. here are a couple of those tools he had, neil armstrong, tom stafford, part of a bipartisan coalition to put the united states on a path to go into orbit. as a boy who grew up within a mile and a half of the johnson space center, i saw ralph hall make history, that my kids, your kids, can see americans go into space. one more slide. we've all talked about the children earlier this year, because you did that, my kid said, dad, let's jump out of a plane when i turn 18. thank you, mr. chairman, you made a difference in my life and a difference to so many people. mr. smith: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from florida, bill posey. mr. posey: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the opportunity to join with me colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged biparti
at the convention was i believe we showed america -- one of the highlights at the convention was we showed america that we are diversifying. we have great enthusiasm, visionary people on our team like susanna martinez, governor haley and senator rubio. i know we just came through a very tough election but i am extremely optimistic about our feature. we are just about two years in office and i am proud of the progress we have made. i know we still have a lot of work to do. we have had tremendous capital investment in our state. google just announced another $200 million investment yesterday. we have restored stability back into state government in iowa has a robust and diverse work force. with over 500138 attendees iowa is on the move with fresh and new faces. we remain committed to providing a business climate that fosters new business, and addition in gives our loyal business is the stability they need to grow and expand. iowa's economy cannot be where it is today without the tough choices and leadership of governor brandstad. havepw many of you here heard me say that governor brandstad was the r
, thanks. >>> and coming up on "good morning america" -- holiday miracle. he was shot in the head defending his girlfriend on the way from a halloween party so how was he able to celebrate thanksgiving with his family. >>> still rolling the stones are going strong. kicking off a new tour tonight. >>> and a daring high dive. watch as a guy jumps from a shopping mall balcony into a fountain, will he make it? >> yes. the anatomy of a bad decision coming up on "fixation" on this sunday morning. don't go anywhere. we're back in a few moments. hey buddy, i bet mom would love this, huh? jack? jaaack? jaaack?! jack?! looks good ladies! jack! come on, stop the car. jack! no, no, no, no, no! the only thing more surprising than finding the perfect gifts.. niice. ...is where you find them. how did you know? i had a little help. this is how to gift. this is sears. i need all the help i can get. i tell them, "come straight to the table." i say, "it's breakfast time, not playtime." "there's fruit, milk and i'm putting a little nutella on your whole-wheat toast." funny, that last part gets through. [ male
world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." i am katty kay. an assault as engines rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming
when the news continues, so how does america heal after such a polarizing election? next we'll tuck to a political -- talk to a political analyst to finds out -- find out. >>> president obama came out the winner last night but it was the most divisive national campaign in memory. that's one of the headlines from rollcall.com. so what can the president do to unite the country? with me now with some analysis is roll call's jonathan strong. jonathan, thank you for being here with us i know you haven't had that much sleep. you were at one of the parties last night and you said overall the democrats were happy but there's a caveat to that. they weren't completely happy. why not? >> right. they did very well in the senate. unbelievably well in the senate. president obama won re-election pretty handily when some people thought it would be close. but in the house, they did not ping up very -- pick up very many seats. somewhere between six and eight seats, they needed 25 to take control to have came which are and a difficult cob -- chamber in 2014. so there was a little bit of undercurrent o
said when the gap back to america he would train slaves that they would become could citizens and free people of the united states. but when he got back things changed. >> welcome to the 303rd annual american book awards co-sponsored by the columbus foundation. we chose the name to indicate as far as we know know, there have been 30,000 years of steroid -- storytelling. so the border directors are john d. macarthur and the but finally the lawyer for the state of california. this event it is being co-sponsored we'll acknowledge their generosity to bring s to the historic room. we want to welcome richard hudson to greet you and it is professor of marriages and a member of the faculty of american studies and interdisciplinary program. he came to the uc berkeley english department 1964 although he continues teaching and tell this but he it is now president of the west literature association. and that the berkley's annual conference in october and then he said the buck with that. [laughter] >> i basically want to say one word. you happen to be in this tool room of the english department. i'
they put him under tremendous pressure and kept asking him, when is america going to free the slaves? so he began making promises that emancipation was really just around the corner. it was imminent. we were waiting for opinions are ripened. none of this was really true, but it was in our interest ran to say that. oddly enough jefferson really did those are some of this radical feeling over there in france. before he left he's set down a plan and told people about it. he told thomas paine, william short, number of other abolitionists over there. .. >> we want to welcome everybody -- we want to welcome everybody to the 33rd annual american book awards sponsored by the four columbus foundation. we choose the name to indicate that as far as we know there's been 30,000 years of storytelling in north america. so the members of our board of directors are john macarthur fellow, recipient of the presidential medal. the current chancellor of the academy of american poets and finally, the current lawyer for the state of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department
. >> the last day of campaigning and america divided. as it prepares for a photo finish result. last minute fran i think campaigning, both candidates head for ohio. the battleground state that could decide who will be the next president. hello and welcome. also coming up in the program, following hard on the heels of the u.s. results, a change in the top in china. what will this mean for the rest of the world? and terrible facts of life for one 15-year-old pakistani girl killed acid by her parents for looking at a boy. hello, it is midday here in london, 6:00 in the morning in madison, wisconsin where president obama is schedule told appear at the start of this, the final day of campaigning, in what's been a grueling and hugely expensive 18 month battle with mitt romney a third of americans have already cast their votes lerl i. both men now have less than 24 hours to convince the undecided in a handful of swing states to come on boards. with the polls pointing to a dead heat, still everything to play for. let's get the latest from my colleague jane hill who joins us live from washington. jane, o
it here in america. [applause] these -- >> these are the kinds of words that inspired his voters. celebrations went on through the night. obama's supporters could not contain their joy. what made the difference was that obama won in the most populous states and managed to secure a greater margin than expected in the swing states. the the final tallies are not yet in, the world has already congratulated him on his victory, but it was a bitter disappointment for the republicans. they have to wait four more years for their next shot at the white house. mitt romney took some time to take in the results, but he was gallant in defeat. >> this is a time of great challenges for america, and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> obama supporters chanted and danced with joy, pinning their hopes and dreams on four more years of the president. it is now up to him not to disappoint them. >> our washington bureau chief joins us now. obama stays in the white house. republicans retain the house of representatives. democrats maintain their majority in the senate.
and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount of military force. but you're right, the story in the 1800s, and the 1900s, until the early 1970s, w
corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news. >> america decides. after an 18-month campaign, americans go to the poles. go to the polls. this is scene live from columbus, ohio. for governor mitt romney, the campaigning continues in two key battleground states. >> president obama promised change. but he couldn't deliver it. i promised change and i have a record of achieving it. >> and planning to play basketball and have a family dinner having issued his final rallying call. >> our work is not done. our fight for change goes on. because we know this nation cannot succeed. >> hello and welcome to gmt. i'm tim wilcox. also coming up in the program, more on the murder of the man who brought down -- and claims neil hayward supplied information about him and his family to britain's secret service. and the blockbuster with game members queuing around the block. hello, it's midday here in london and 7:00 a.m. in beijing and 7:00 a.m. in washington where after the campaign, the polls have opened. let's go live to jane hill there. >> hello. and welcome to washington, d.c. mil
, thank you. appreciate it. >> yeah. >>> today both candidates are offering their vision for america. this is an exclusive opinion article for cnn.com on our worldwide website. president obama who just spoke in ohio a short while ago right on cnn.com today saying i believe america's prosperity was built on the strength of our middle class. we don't succeed when a few of the top do well while everyone else struggles to get by. we're better off when everyone gets a fair shot. everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. the man who wants his job, of course, former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, spoke in wisconsin. that was just a short time ago. he is also on cnn.com. his opinion speech. romney wrote about bipartisanship. he says i am offering a contrast to what we're seeing in washington today. we watched as one party has pushed through its agenda without compromising with the other party. there's much gridlock and pettiness dominating while important issues facing the nation while high unemployment go unaddressed. the bickering has to end. i will end it
with one another and i think doing so gives us a history of what his america looks like and it helps us to rethink not only what was going on in the south but what was going on and the national conservative political realm as well rethinking strom thurmond helps us to rethink the modern conservatism. a history that i think too often thurmond is left out of because we remember him as a kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. recounts a decision by five men in putting her on goal rob cox to join the british army in the spring of 1941. six months prior to perlo harbor in america's involvement in world war ii. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you. thank you for that kind introduction and for introducing me to bill lewis whose name as far as i can tell the epicenter of support in the entire united states. [applause] thank you tuzee stan booktv for making me feel like oprah winfrey if only for an hour. it's wonderful to be here. is this everything a bookstore should be. i am happy to be in vermont because i have longstanding family ties with the state. can you hear? ta
, cloaked in the argument of what is good for america, but there is not allow a policy prescription in there. >> thank you. >> this event took place at the seventeenth annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information visit texasbookfestival.org. >> tell us when you think of your programming this weekend. comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> next, chrystia freeland talked about a rise of the superrich, the.-- the top 0.one% of the population and the impact they have in the world. this is hosted by politics and prose bookstore in washington d.c. and it is about an hour. [applause] >> thanks a lot. sorry to keep everyone waiting. i will say a few things about what is in the book. as i have been doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers in the conversation is to save the rich have always been with us after all. actually, that is not true. one of the points, the starting point of my book is to say actually things are different now. we really need to be aware of this new political and economic real
in america to endorse mitt romney, that i traveled literally tens of thousands of miles for him, raised tens of millions of dollars for him and worked harder i think than any other surrogate in america other than paul ryan. >>> hours after his re-election win, president obama dove right back into politics that loom over the fiscal cliff debate. he and his family returned to washington where the president called congressional leaders to talk about finding bipartisan solutions to reducing the debt, cut middle class taxes and create jobs. house speaker john boehner said under the right conditions republicans would consider new sources of raising revenue, but only if the president took an inclusive approach. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led, not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. we want you to lead, not as a liberal or conservative, but as president of the united states of america. we want you to succeed. let's challenge ourselves to find the common ground that has eluded us. let's rise above the dysfunction and do the right thing together for our country
for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how those values remain the cornerstone of cbs news today in our digital age. he became the chairman and february 2011. cbs news won a peabody award under his leadership and was the only network to grow its audience. he also has relaunched cbs this morning with a focus on a harder news. he has served as executive producer of 60 minutes giving it a new graphical again emphasizing more timeless stories. he also grew the show's online presence by revamping 60 minutes.com and launching the ipad app. under his leadership, 60 minutes reaches an estimated 121 million unique viewers a season. more than double that of the nearest competitor a
across america right now. be an early bird, get your ticket, because as the frenzy builds and the wednesday night jackpot approaches, that line is expected to climb and the lines should climb with them. a mad dash saturday night for the last-minute chance to win $325 million, the thanksgiving weekend payout to be truly thankful for. >> who knows, you know. somebody's got to win. >> reporter: but those six numbers proved to be more elusive than a mall parking spot on black friday. the bright side, the unwon powerball jackpot now swells to an estimated $425 million. the largest jackpot in powerball history. enough dough to buy 2,000 ferraris or the entire country of anguillas twice. >> that kind of money. i'd have a heart attack. >> reporter: it also surpasses the previous powerball record of $365 million. that windfall claimed by eight co-workers in lincoln, nebraska, back in 2006. the odds of winning your $425 million, still about 1 in 175 million, or to put it another way, that's about 25 times less likely than you winning an academy award. even slimmer than your chances
and south america upside-down. what would happen if we looked at -- there's no reason we can look at it that way. north doesn't have to be a top. we could put south of the top who wanted to. >> host: we will have to leave it there. i apologize. out of time. kenneth davis has been our guest here on "in-depth". . . >> your internet is 20 times faster uploading and 10 times faster downloading. all these other countries understand a fundamental principle. in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along, and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along, it was highways, the interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway, and what does the industry say? oh, don't call us that anymore. >> best selling author david cay johnston on the many ways corporations try to rob you blind tonight at 10 each on "after words." and tomorrow watch for live coverage of tom wolfe from opening night at miami book fair international this week
. >> happy holidays. >> yes. >> absolutely. >>> let's begin with america's latest powerball millionaires. one in arizona. one in missouri. and alex perez is in the small town of dearborn, missouri, where one lucky man is about to go public with his good fortune. good morning, alex. >> reporter: well, george, good morning. within hours, the big mystery in this teeny, tiny town could be over. officials will announce who holds that ticket today. if you ask anyone around town here, they'll tell you they already know. it's a factory worker named mark hill. the avalanche of speculation began when this man, mark hill, updated the status on his facebook account late thursday, writing, we are truly blessed. we are the lucky winners of the powerball. within hours, his facebook page went dark. but his family began celebrating. telling abc news, hill is the big winner. >> he's worked very hard in his life and he won't have to anymore. >> just shocked. i mean, just -- i thought we were all going to have heart attacks. >> reporter: hill's mother says he and his wife, cindy, have three grown sons and an ado
for a possible ground invasion. we're live in gaza. >>> and coming to america. the u.s., a beacon of freedom and hope for people all around the world. the dream of citizenship about to be fulfilled from these people. they come from different lands with different stories to tell, but they will all become americans live today, friday, november 16th, 2012. >>> from nbc news, this is "today" with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. as we look at statue of liberty live, we are going to witness something really remarkable today on our plaza, and if there's a dry eye left when this ceremony is over i'll be amazed. 30 people who have worked so hard to become u.s. citizens, a wait that sometimes was measured in decades will become u.s. citizens on our plaza. >> so many of us take it for granted. those people out on the plaza do not take it for granted. their family members are here to witness it as well. it's amazing. >> one minute famili
schools and join the british army in the spring of 1941. six months prior to pearl harbor and america's involvement in world war ii. this is about one hour. >> thank you. thank you so much. thank you for the kind introduction and thank you for introducing me the epicenter of support in the united states. thank you to c-span and booktv to making me feel like oprah winfrey, if only for an hour. it is wonderful to be here. isn't it everything that a bookstore should be? i am thrilled to be here at the north shire. i am also happy to be in vermont because i have long-standing family ties with the state and i have ties with the state. my book really got started here in vermont. when i was a little girl, i used to spend my school vacations with my grandmother who lived in a federal style house on main street in windsor, vermont, on the connecticut river. i spent the summers lolling around, reading and imagining what it was like to live there. one was like to live there before i was born. my father had a big family. he had two sisters and four brothers. the most famous of them would be arch
$425 million. odds of winning, 1 in 175 million. good luck. for "good morning america," clayton sandell, abc news, denver. >> i like those odds. we got three tickets, the producers bought us. if i don't show up for work tomorrow morning, don't be suspicious. >> you're splitting that with me. >> absolutely. >>> it was a bizarre sight. i think we can agree to that. >> hilarious. >> imagine walking down a busy street and seeing a camel running straight at you. >> the camel was on the lam from the circus. and abc's john muller is here with the story. >> reporter: good morning, guys. roadways around los angeles are famous and infamous for a lot of reasons. yesterday, a new one for that list. a camel on the run. his name is abdullah. he's not a movie star. but he's a performer. and he turned plenty of heads. who knew camels were so fast? who knew you could find out right on this los angeles county street. that's abdullah, the camel. those are his handlers, sprinting to catch him, getting left in the dust. >> there was like ten people running after this camel. it was craziness on the streets.
departure she wrote a letter to ronald reagan describing the time she had spent in america doing what she liked best, looking at beautiful thoroughbreds and walking in the wide-open spaces by the absence. the american west had a long held a fascination for the queen. one of her most intriguing american friends has been a monty roberts, a california cowboy who is known as the horse whisperer for his humane techniques to train horses in a circular pen. she was so impressed by what she had read about his approach that she invited him to demonstrate his technique at windsor castle in 1989. come show me this lion's cage of yours, she said. do i need a whip and change? as montae recalled to me, said that not only with the twinkle but that her message addressing him clearly her talent put him at ease. his demonstration was a big success, and the queen and the cowboys struck up a fast. over lunch in the castle garden she asked him numerous questions i saw mine open up, he recalled. when he told her something that she did not know she would sit on the edge of her chair, he said, with a humility of
't the case the super rich have been with us but actually there is a reluctance particularly in america, i am canadian so i see with a little bit of a distance, in america there is a reluctance to talk about the income distribution of. one of my friends was supposed to be here tonight i talked to him about this and he said a was once told by the head of a prestigious think-tank they were unlikely to find any work that had wealth inequality in the title. they could finance anything with poverty elimination but that was a different matter. why? because the party of some people put be in a warm glow. charity is a good thing and many ethical points earned all the tiny amounts are given to the four but every mention raises the issue of the appropriateness or legitimacy. that is true even with the discussion generally a lot of action is in the top 1% people get anxious and with the publication of my book bill daley was on the panel and he started the talk by saying i guess it is okay. and i said yes. it is okay. what is causing the big gap? year rather obviously the people who are most interested 1
>>> good morning, america. breaking news. the massive nor'easter battering areas hardest hit by sandy. a foot of snow, powering winds over 60 miles per hour, taking one trees and power lines, for thousands of hurricane victims just back on their feet. our extreme weather team has the latest from the storm zone. >>> wall street worries. the worst day of the year for your money. the stocks plummet the day after the election. what's behind the huge plunge? and what it means for your bank account. >>> high-speed heist. a jaw-dropping robbery in the middle of the day. thieves on motorcycles, ripping off hundreds of thousands in jewelry. and it's all caught on tape. >>> and girl power. the 9-year-old tearing up the gridiron, leaving the boys in her dust. we'll hear from the boys she's beating. and we'll talk to her, live. >>> good morning, everyone. boy, sam is about the prettiest running back i've ever seen. >> she is. i can say that, as a former cheerleader. >> hello to robin, recovering. as you see, elizabeth vargas is here. president obama back at the white house right now. his
america's 16th president gets the spielberg treatment. >>> finally tonight days after our nation's 44th president was re-elected to a second term the spotlight turns to america's 16th president -- at the movies at least. abraham lincoln getting the big screen treatment courtesy of steven spielberg. here's nbc's kevin tibbles. >> reporter: he may have started out the poor self-educated son of homesteaders, but for thousands of school children who visit the museum honoring his presidency every week abraham lincoln remains a beacon whose convictions shaped a nation. >> he did a lot for our country. we can learn from the past to help improve what our future is going to be. >> reporter: at 6'4" abraham lincoln was a tall man of even greater historic stature. >> he did a lot, especially for my culture as far as with the emancipation proclamation and his thoughts and ideas of how to really run our country. i thought it was pretty cool. >> reporter: presidents may not have been considered cool in the 1860s, but this one is about to become a hollywood star. >> i like our chances now. >> reporter
states of america. .. >> if i can add one more thing, remember the beginning of the united states of america. economy of the this southern states in the northern states is very different. they were very different from each other. even today, the economy is very different. we found a way to deal with that and the regulators are the same is true in europe and china and india. same is the same is true and brazil. this country deals with gaps between the rich and poor, agriculture, and earthen industrialize an evolving in much the same way that we're going to have to on the global stage for a the problem has been solved and can be solved. >> host: good afternoon, we have a caller from new york city. >> caller: hello, i'm so happy you're taking my call. my question is this fiscal cliff that we are approaching. if president obama allows it to happen, what kind of catastrophe are you talking about? i'm kind of concerned? so negatively will this affect the industry? how bad will it really be out there on wall street and main street? >> guest: well, let's say there are a bunch of people wh
state. >> guest: even in those days as it is today, and, still, perhaps america's one -- one of america's most famous anti-slavery advocates, a radical abolitionist. he didn't start that way, but at this point he was. seward, not radical on anti-slavery issues was perceived that way because of a series of speeches he gave viewed as inflammatory. lincoln, on the other hand, because he did not have a national record, could convincingly portray himself as the least radical. in those days, the least anti-slavery republican, up for the race. they go it, and seward doesn't just have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york. seward has thor weed -- >> host: great name. best name ever of an american political figure. >> guest: marvelous. it's portraying weeds', you know, nature, i guess. the finest political operative in the mid 19th century america has to offer. he goes to the convention. he has essentially infinite financial resources in the days when deals under the table involved cash as well as anything else you can imagine. >> host: t
: good morning. some stunning numbers in this study. it's a part of america. a new study looked at emergency room data across the country to determine how many kids are getting injured in how many inflatable bouncers. >> oh, my gosh. oh, my gosh! >> reporter: watch as this inflatable slide goes airborne. there's children inside, then crashes down on a crowd. >> i couldn't even get up. i fell so hard. >> reporter: 13 people were injured, including children. the most serious cases typically from bounce houses that weren't tied down. take a look at this house that flipped due to strong winds and wraps around a pole. it's just the kind of startling videos the thors authors of a new report about these inflatable amusements want parents to consider. researchers say from 1990 to 2010, more than 64,000 children were sent to the e.r. due to injuries of these air-filled playhouses. last year, the study, the average of 31 children were hurt each day. most of the injuries came from children falling down or running into each other, resulting most often in broken bones and sprains to the arms
their loved ones. but we must not rush to judgment. in america, due process means that innocence is presumed unless and until the trial proves otherwise. there has been no trial yet and our family member is considered to be innocent by lot, and by us. >> questions like whether or not a second gunman was involved and whether the sergeant is suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder. a general is expected to make a decision by next week. >> you are watching "bbc world news." here are the headlines. china has begun the process of handing over to a new generation of leaders the close of the communist party congress in beijing. millions of people are joining in protests across europe, budget cuts are aimed at reducing government debt. let's pick up on what is going on in europe. all over, the message is the same. people have had enough, you want to go out on strike. >> there are nerves among some investors in the markets, hundreds of thousands across europe and they are very worried. highlights, focusing on austerity, so say the protesters. austerity measures to not work. this is what europe i
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